Design for Sleep-Overs & Slumber Parties

By Carolin Santangelo

It could be a symptom of the economy, that prospective homeowners are taking a good, hard look at their wish list prior to scoping out their new home design and are seeking the most effective way to utilize all the space. These new homes are meant to be shared with family and friends; though budget is often a limiting factor on what size the home can be.

Multi-purpose sleeping spaces have been incorporated into recent custom home projects (in both large and small homes). In secondary bedrooms, clients are thinking not just of single stack bunk beds, also of pyramid bunks, or built-in bunks for even more children to camp out in. A pyramid bunk is one that can have a double- or queen-size bed at the bottom and a single bunk overhead. These are particularly good for overflow sleeping space, and may even be utilized in spaces where ceilings slope.

In a couple of recent home designs, where the living room is on the main living floor for all to use, clients were interested in an additional family room on another floor that would serve as overflow space for sleeping children. Sleeper sofas can fit the bill, though imaginative options for built-in bunks with storage beneath can be constructed, preserving floor space for other family activity; television, gaming or board games.

In three bedroom plans, it may be adequate to have just one room dedicated to this additional sleeping space. In four bedroom designs, and where the house may be used for rental purposes, it could be smart to outfit two bedrooms with bunks — maybe one for boys, another one for girls — with two remaining bedrooms that will accommodate separate sets of adults in privacy. A study or office can also be set up for daybed and trundle in case of overnight guests.
Bunk space can be defined that is intended for adults, too. To accommodate adults with a conventional twin mattress, the space should be 39 inches wide and 75 or 80 inches long. In one house design, a bunkroom was also to lodge men who were guests of the homeowner, and would be staying for the week while they hunted. A design for a pool house incorporates overflow-sleeping space in a loft created by the high sloped ceiling. The design includes end-to-end built-in twin beds tucked under the sloping roofline. Each built-in area has its own lighting, and a storage drawer beneath.
Options for small rooms include bunk sets angled and built into a corner, freeing floor space in front for toys and play. A bunk can be a great play area in itself! It can be a fort or castle or play house. Designs can lend themselves from woodsy and rustic, in dark wood tones (think camouflage bedding), to nautical; with incorporation of white bead board, red, white and blue fabrics, portholes, and nautical lighting.
A novel, convertible sleeping space can be created with a rope or chain style suspended from the ceiling or walls. My family beach house had rope and chain styles, way ahead of its time, conceived by my parents over 40 years ago! One room contained double bed bunks (top and bottom) mounted to the wall on one side, and suspended from the ceiling joists by heavy chain on the other side. The other room had double bed bunks, as well as a single bed platform that was hinged to the wall on one side, and affixed by heavy rope and chain on the other. The beauty of this hinged arrangement was that it could be folded up against the wall, freeing up floor space when not in use.
Your builder and trim carpenter can construct your custom design, or you can select from a variety of manufactured bunk beds and loft beds. Retailers offer a wide selection of children’s themed loft beds beginning as low as $200, and as the price goes up, may incorporate storage; chests, drawers and shelves, desks and may conserve even more space with roll out beds and trundles.
Think about the best way to accommodate your overnight guests. Nights shared together by cousins and friends as children will create memories as powerful as evenings sitting around a fire cooking marshmallows, building that huge sand castle or catching that first fish!
Seaside Home Design, LLC endeavors to educate Islander readers regarding a full spectrum of home design and construction issues; products and materials and construction techniques; particularly those specific to seaward construction, and also profiles interesting custom-home design projects. Carolin Santangelo is a home designer and owner of Seaside Home Design, LLC. Contact SeasideHome@windstream.net, or 409-632-0381 or visit www.SeasideHomeDesign.com.

It could be a symptom of the economy, that prospective homeowners are taking a good, hard look at their wish list prior to scoping out their new home design and are seeking the most effective way to utilize all the space. These new homes are meant to be shared with family and friends; though budget is often a limiting factor on what size the home can be.
Multi-purpose sleeping spaces have been incorporated into recent custom home projects (in both large and small homes). In secondary bedrooms, clients are thinking not just of single stack bunk beds, also of pyramid bunks, or built-in bunks for even more children to camp out in. A pyramid bunk is one that can have a double- or queen-size bed at the bottom and a single bunk overhead. These are particularly good for overflow sleeping space, and may even be utilized in spaces where ceilings slope.
In a couple of recent home designs, where the living room is on the main living floor for all to use, clients were interested in an additional family room on another floor that would serve as overflow space for sleeping children. Sleeper sofas can fit the bill, though imaginative options for built-in bunks with storage beneath can be constructed, preserving floor space for other family activity; television, gaming or board games.
In three bedroom plans, it may be adequate to have just one room dedicated to this additional sleeping space. In four bedroom designs, and where the house may be used for rental purposes, it could be smart to outfit two bedrooms with bunks — maybe one for boys, another one for girls — with two remaining bedrooms that will accommodate separate sets of adults in privacy. A study or office can also be set up for daybed and trundle in case of overnight guests.
Bunk space can be defined that is intended for adults, too. To accommodate adults with a conventional twin mattress, the space should be 39 inches wide and 75 or 80 inches long. In one house design, a bunkroom was also to lodge men who were guests of the homeowner, and would be staying for the week while they hunted. A design for a pool house incorporates overflow-sleeping space in a loft created by the high sloped ceiling. The design includes end-to-end built-in twin beds tucked under the sloping roofline. Each built-in area has its own lighting, and a storage drawer beneath.
Options for small rooms include bunk sets angled and built into a corner, freeing floor space in front for toys and play. A bunk can be a great play area in itself! It can be a fort or castle or play house. Designs can lend themselves from woodsy and rustic, in dark wood tones (think camouflage bedding), to nautical; with incorporation of white bead board, red, white and blue fabrics, portholes, and nautical lighting.
A novel, convertible sleeping space can be created with a rope or chain style suspended from the ceiling or walls. My family beach house had rope and chain styles, way ahead of its time, conceived by my parents over 40 years ago! One room contained double bed bunks (top and bottom) mounted to the wall on one side, and suspended from the ceiling joists by heavy chain on the other side. The other room had double bed bunks, as well as a single bed platform that was hinged to the wall on one side, and affixed by heavy rope and chain on the other. The beauty of this hinged arrangement was that it could be folded up against the wall, freeing up floor space when not in use.
Your builder and trim carpenter can construct your custom design, or you can select from a variety of manufactured bunk beds and loft beds. Retailers offer a wide selection of children’s themed loft beds beginning as low as $200, and as the price goes up, may incorporate storage; chests, drawers and shelves, desks and may conserve even more space with roll out beds and trundles.

Think about the best way to accommodate your overnight guests. Nights shared together by cousins and friends as children will create memories as powerful as evenings sitting around a fire cooking marshmallows, building that huge sand castle or catching that first fish!
Seaside Home Design, LLC endeavors to educate Islander readers regarding a full spectrum of home design and construction issues; products and materials and construction techniques; particularly those specific to seaward construction, and also profiles interesting custom-home design projects. Carolin Santangelo is a home designer and owner of Seaside Home Design, LLC. Contact SeasideHome@windstream.net, or 409-632-0381 or visit www.SeasideHomeDesign.com.

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