By Elisabeth Lanier

Did you go to school to become an artist?
No, I didn’t. My love for fiber found me at a very young age. My paternal grandmother was a tailor in San Francisco. I’d spend weekends behind her cast iron sewing machine playing with billows of fabric and lace edgings, pins, batting and other fiber scraps. Textures and colors filled my senses and stimulated my imagination. My maternal grandmother, with whom I spent my summers, taught me to crochet when I was seven. Thirty-five years later, I picked up a crochet hook and re-taught myself. Dyeing fiber and spinning yarn are the children born of my desire for the most lusciously color-rich and texturally interesting yarn I can imagine. A lesson behind a spinning wheel and a class in different methods of dyeing fibers by a gracious and passionate fiber artist who was willing to share her knowledge with me finally made this possible.

Where do you get your ideas?
Ideas come to me almost always while I am working on another project. I have learned to stop what I am doing and write down notes that will trigger that same emotion and idea to explore after the current project is completed. It takes a lot of discipline. My first instinct is to drop everything and move on to my newest idea. So keeping a conceptual journal is invaluable. I use clippings from magazines, odd color combinations that intrigue me, interesting combinations of textures that I find throughout daily life – all of these things are added to my conceptual journal for exploration at a later date. I have a strict rule not to exceed three projects at a time. Otherwise, nothing would ever be completed. Rotating three projects keeps me fresh and allows me to work on whichever project suits my mood at the time.
How long does that take?
Dying fiber can take very little time, about 40 minutes in very hot water under controlled heat. However, in the summer months, I prefer the solar method of dyeing fiber. This requires an entire sun-filled day. I put various fibers like merino wool, tussah silk, alpaca, Angora rabbit, and curly locks from angora goats into large glass jars filled with water and some vinegar and place the jars on my dock for the day. I drop two to four colors on top of the solution, put a lid on it and leave for work. As the solution warms under the relentless heat of the southern Texas sun, the colors begin to naturally drop into the fiber as they choose in their own fashion. The heat of the day sets the colors and thus solar dyeing is accomplished. After work, I drain the jars, rinse the fibers in cool water and hang them to dry overnight. The next day the fibers are ready to be carded into a large batt, which is used to spin into yarn. Then, it takes approximately eight hours to completely spin and ply 200 yards of homespun, chunky art yarn.
Define ‘artist.’
My definition of an artist is simply a person who, by virtue of imagination, is able to create exceptional beauty. If I am able to evoke the emotions of goodness, truth and beauty to my audience then I am an artist. Each yard of fiber that passes through my fingers and unfolds like a blossoming flower at the spinning wheel or the joy that I feel at its inherent beauty is a palpable emotion. If I am able to evoke that emotion, that passion that I felt in its making in my audience then I have succeeded as an artist.
How would you describe your own work?
I would describe my own work, as well, incredible! I put my heart and soul into the making of it, but it still amazes me that the finished product actually comes from my hands. I almost feel as if I’m only guiding the fiber and I let each batch do what it intends to do. Fighting the particular nature of different fibers is like swimming upstream. I have found that allowing the fiber to do what it wants to naturally brings out the individual personality of the fiber.
Why do you make art?
Because I must. I haven’t a choice in the matter. I am driven to create and I could not imagine life without it. I also like feeling that I am fulfilling a function in preserving a craft and an art form that has been replaced by machines and is almost lost. There have been times when I haven’t been able to afford, either in time or money, the luxury of creating. I am fortunate and so very grateful to have a wonderfully supportive husband, son and family who constantly encourage and enable me to be my best creative self.
Why is art important in today’s culture?
Humankind and art cannot function without one another. We have a burning desire to create. Creating art, like any other worthwhile goal, requires a driving passion, a fierce determination, perseverance, patience and a positive attitude, all of which build character. Without these, the mind and senses are left to drift idly and without purpose.
Are your from here originally? If not, why did you choose Galveston Island?
No, I’m a San Franciscan and have had the very great pleasure to have grown up in one of the most beautiful places in the world. My playground was the Pacific Ocean with beautiful beaches and majestic mountains, ravines and giant redwood forests that line the coast like ancient sentinels.
I did not choose Galveston Island; Galveston chose me! I was brought here by a very fortuitous series of events and am grateful to have been received so graciously into the arms of Galveston.
What are the special opportunities and/or challenges of making art in Galveston?
First and foremost is the proximity to the Gulf of Mexico. The natural beauty that comes from the mix of water, sand, marsh and all of that wildlife is awe-inspiring. The beautiful colors that I am able to produce in dyeing my fibers on the shores, under the intensity of the summer sun are nothing short of spectacular.

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Affaire d’art is an international fine art gallery located in the historic district of Galveston, Texas. Housed in a 1900 Storm survivor building, they will present work in fine art mediums including paintings, photography, 2D mixed media, pottery and sculpture. Built from the ground up by local Galveston artist Sharis DeJaynes, the gallery is focused on exposing artists work from different regions and countries. Local, national and international fine artists are encouraged to apply for space at www.affairedart.com.
The doors to Affaire d’art open for business on January 5 and hours of operation are Thursdays – Sundays, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and by appointment. Their grand opening event will be held in conjunction with Galveston’s first ArtWalk of the New Year on Saturday, Jan. 28 from 6 to 10 p.m.
The gallery is located at 2227 Postoffice Street, Suite B. For more information call 409-789-0079 or go online to www.affairedart.com.

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By Jessica Dobson

Attendees of the Galveston ArtWalks can now enjoy a new kind of art as local poet, James M. Rankin, better known as “The Saltwater Poet,” takes to the streets, performing readings of his works outside Cruz Cortez Clothiers.
Internationally recognized for his professional and motivational books, such as “Power of the Creed,” “The Magic of Method Selling,” and “Optimistm, A Life Enriching Philosophy,” Rankin takes time out to write poetry. He has published multiple works, including “The Philosopher Poet” and “Dawning of the Day,” with several more projects in the works.

A local Galvestonian, Rankin graduated from Texas State University and earned his graduate degrees from Kennedy Western University and now works for a financial service company as the National Marketing Director. While Rankin has a strong business background, his interest in poetry and performance started early. As a middle school student, Rankin found his knack for story telling when reading his short story homework aloud for his classmates.
Years later, Rankin began Left Brain Right Brain Publications, to share his work with the world and in the hopes of opening doors for other aspiring writers. He is also in the beginnings of starting a literary society on the island for those who enjoy the craft. Rankin encourages aspiring writers to “never loose hope, always perfect the craft, write whenever you can, even if you don’t feel like writing, it’s important.”
After publishing nearly a dozen books, Rankin has found his niche in poetry, a truly free style which offers “the ability to step outside of the concrete to look at the subject in an artistic form, capturing the emotion of a moment forever.” He also hopes Left Brain Right Brain Publications can help create an awareness of the value of poetry.
A true islander at heart, Rankin draws much of his inspiration from the seaside environment. He explains that the subject of many of his poems is the ocean, as “it is a metaphor for life, the ebb and flow, the life it sustains and the beauty it presents.” Rankin describes his style of “metaphysical,” as his work often explores our attempts at understanding our existence. He also draws great inspiration from the potentiality of people, “Everyone can improve. I hope my poetry inspires people to recognize the greatness that is in everyone, especially themselves.”
Check out www.lbrbpub.com or stop by Cruz Cortez Clothiers at 2227 Postoffice Street to purchase copies of Rankin’s books, have your copy signed or just enjoy a live reading during the ArtWalk January 28th. Rankin is also available for for private poetry readings and public speaking events. Contact him at artran@msn.com or 409-370-9975.

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GalvestonArts Center is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by Dallas-based artist Charlotte Smith titled “dot, dot,dot.” The exhibition will open during the January 28 ArtWalk and remain on view through February 26. Curator Clint Willour will lead a gallery talk with the artist beginning at 6:30 pm during ArtWalk.The event is free and open to the public.

Described as “trans-dimensional,” Smith’s works are at once sculptural paintings and painted sculpture. Building multi-colored strata of paint, Smith variously flattens the paint blobs onto the surface of the canvas, creating colorful,confetti-like concentric circles. In other works, she attaches slender stacks of droplets to the canvas, evoking dangling stalactites or beaded strings. Finally, she abandons the substrate altogether, creating piles of paint blobropes. While the influence of French Pointillist Georges Seurat is evident, Smith is much more interested in the manipulation of the material and repetitive mark making than creating a specific image.
In her most recent work, Smith layers glossy droplets of paint over brightly colored and textured backgrounds of polychromatic drips, puddles and pools. Again avoiding overt imagery, the canvases are reminiscent of seascapes (Lost in You, 2011), fields of flowers (Coraluscious, 2011), or even something that might be encountered under a microscope (Gray Glow, 2011). Smith’s fields of color swirl and melt.
“This series signals a breakthrough, a point of departure,” writes art critic Catherine Anspon. “Smith’s convincing, surely applied brushwork and new, inventive media are novel and pioneering…. It’s not necessary to know how these sculptural canvases were formed. It’s enough to simply savor the effects.”
Smith received an MFA from the University of North Texas at Denton in 1999. Recent solo exhibitions of her work have been hosted at Cris Worley Fine Arts, Dallas; Anya Tish Gallery, Houston; and George Billis Gallery, Los Angeles. Her work is included in the exhibition Obsessive Worlds currently on view at the Art Museum of Southeast Texas in Beaumont. Smith is included in the publication Texas Artists Today, written by Catherine Anspon and published in 2010 by Marquand Books. The artist currently lives and works in Dallas.
Galveston Arts Center is operating in a temporary downtown location on the corner of Market and 25th streets. The exhibitiong allery and selections from GAC’s retail gallery, ArtWorks, are open to the public Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is free at all times. A flyer listing all ArtWalk participants with times and locations can be downloaded at www.contemporaryartgalveston.org.

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Continuing at Buchanan Gallery is our annual Group Show & Jewelry Extravaganza, featuring paintings, sculpture and jewelry by a diverse group of our most popular gallery artists. This exhibition is on view through Jan. 21, 2012.

Of particular interest, Buchanan Gallery offers new pieces of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, created by local, national and international artists including Anke Bohmer, Diana Diebold, Priscilla Frake, Mary Jarvis, Armande Potel Martin, Margarita Mileva, Julia Morrison, Jo Preston, Cathy Prieto-Smith, Mary Rogers, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, Lisa M. Wilson, and Dottie Wood. Jewelry is located in our Gift Gallery, along with many other unique works of art.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic Streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment. For more information please call 409-763-8683 or visit us online at www.buchanangallery.com.

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Visit the gallery in January to see local photographer Irene Quiroga’s most popular bird images printed on canvas. Large pieces filled with flocks of pelicans along the shore or Roseate Spoonbills taking flight in her action packed image “Pink Squadron” adorns the interior walls of the Urban Lofts. Artist and owner, Jennifer Peck shows a new collection of Galveston’s most glorious migratory birds in simple pastel compositions. Her newest collages parade Indigo and Painted Buntings, Scarlet Tanagers, Sparrows and Warblers against soft peaches, light blues and greens.

Later in January, PeckArts opens “Scenes from the Fence” with Houston’s ‘Outside Artist’ Homer Allen. Recycled billboard vinyl as canvas allows these pieces to be placed anywhere outside or inside the home. Big, bold and bright flowers take command in this current series and show the viewer what it would be like if flowers could say “POW!”
PeckArts Galleries are located at 2208 Postoffice. Open from Wednesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and anytime by appointment. For more information please call 409-621-1500 or visit the gallery online at www.PeckArts.com.

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Palms, palms, palms! Galveston has them and, for the January 28 ArtWalk, Gayle Reynolds will be painting them.
Rex Reynolds has been trying a new stain on his tallboys. It’s white and transparent so the grain shows through. Gayle Reynolds is calling them his “White Linen Chairs,” because of their clean look. Rex is boning up on his dory-building skills just now because he will be starting a new boat soon.

Other artists exhibiting in The Water’s Edge include: Pat Moberley Moore with her bronze sculptures. She is also starting a new series of sculptures of women in clay. Charles Caillouet has carved and painted wooden birds and stoneware pottery on display.
David Michael Brady has stoneware bowls for the kitchen as well as his chili bowls. Other pottery is by John Whitman and Madeleine Baker. Blown glass is by Patricia Gruy.
The Water’s Edge Studio and Gallery is located at 1302 21st Street at Avenue M. The Gallery is open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sometimes, the owners leave at lunchtime. Visit www.galvestonwatersedge.com or call 409-762-1925.

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René Wiley Studio and Gallery is showing views of Galveston’s alleyways and streets as seen by local oil painter René Wiley during both “Nightand Day,” as her most recent show is titled. For these newest pieces Wiley has explored adding new colors into her palette for the artificial light that illuminates downtown at night. The artist and owner has beautifully reconstructed downtown Galveston’s architecture into simplified abstractions of the originals. Wiley is inspired by the geometric patterns of form, light and shadow that are found in the East End neighborhoods and her signature use of bold color and thick oil paint to build these uniquely Galveston structures will impress you.

Join the gallery for ArtWalk from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28, for the opening reception of “Light and Water,” a series of paintings by Rachel Wiley focusing on harbor nightscapes that capture glistening lights upon the bay. Original paintings from previous shows, which include dramatic compositions of Galveston’s native Texas birds, some of which were done in collaboration with local wildlife photographer Irene Amiet Quiroga, as well as serene marshlandscapes and downtown Galveston’s historic churches, are all available in the gallery. Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.
Popular wood sculptor James D. Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has new reclaimed woodsculptures on display in the gallery, depicting local marine life such as pelicans, cranes, redfish and rays. Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, textile mosaic paintings of Galveston’s downtown architecture available in the gallery. Beautiful laminated wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks are turned from the ‘Iked’ Broadway Oak Trees and other reclaimed wood. Glass artist Bill Meek’s gorgeous hammered glass bowls and sculptures are on display, as well as jewelry artist Becky Wolfe’s handwoven crosses of turquoise and amethyst stones.
Other paintings in the gallery include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, published in “Texas Traditions: Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State,” by Michael Duty. Newest to the gallery is Wiley’scollection of urban and rural landscapes, executed in both water soluble oils and acrylic mediums.
The René Wiley Studio and Gallery is located at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewiley.com.

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By Elisabeth Lanier

Did you go to school for that?
As a matter of fact, I have a formal academic background in art. I received my BFA from North Texas State University (now called The University of North Texas, College of Visual Arts And Design), where I also started graduate work and did some teaching. Later, I transferred to the University of Houston where I received my MFA. Since then I’ve stayed pretty close to the academic art world, teaching at various colleges and universities over the years including Galveston College, Houston Community College and the University of Houston. My current teaching ‘home’ is Alvin Community College where we have a great studio and offer credit and non-credit jewelry making and metalsmithing classes. Next to making art, teaching is my second passion. One reason it’s so rewarding is that I am continually learning and growing because of it!
Where do you get your ideas?

I’m glad you asked about ideas because one thing that differentiates ‘art jewelry’ from other types of jewelry (such as designer jewelry or fashion jewelry), is that it originates from an idea – meaning it has some sort of intellectual content, as opposed to being purely ornamental. The value of an art jewelry piece is aligned more with artistic expression and aesthetics than with the intrinsic value of materials used. Inspiration for my one-of-a-kind work comes from a variety of sources: historical painting; classical sculpture; historical styles of ornament; architecture and architectural embellishment; historical jewelry forms; iconography; and my own history of ideas as they develop; accumulate; merge and diverge.
How long does that take?
Most of the time I don’t want to know! Of course, with my production and limited-edition work, which is more design and retail-oriented, I do know the time involved — to the minute in fact. But that is only because labor is a key pricing component. Otherwise, when I’m making a one-of-a-kind piece, I don’t count the minutes, hours, days or months. That would only hinder my artistic freedom and ruin the pleasurable experience of creating, which for me is the greatest benefit of being an artist.
Define “artist.”
There are a lot of stereotypes, but I can honestly say that I know a lot of artists and none of them are starving. Seriously though, I believe an artist is someone who expresses ideas in innovative ways. There are many kinds of artists and many levels of art making. To me, to be a – I hesitate to use the word “professional” because it implies so many things, so I’ll say “serious”— to be a serious artist means your life is predominately defined by your artistic pursuits and vice versa. In my own experiences as a visual artist, I often feel like I am also an inventor, engineer and sometimes even a poet!
How would you describe your own work?
I work in several veins: There is my production and limited-edition work, which is comprised of jewelry design inspired by nature. This collection of work is reminiscent of natural forms such as twigs and seed pods. It pays allegiance to elegance and wearability and is designed to appeal to a broad audience.
Then there is my one-of-a-kind, mixed media art jewelry. In this ever-evolving practice, I often combine two-dimensional or low-relief pictorial space with three-dimensional jewelry forms. That is to say, pictures form the central visual and conceptual elements of my fabricated brooches, lockets, neckpieces and other jewelry forms. My diminutive pictorial expressions are either invented or borrowed from art historical sources. I use a variety of art materials and techniques to create the images that are chosen for their emotional and intellectual impact as well as their aesthetic value. The fabricated jewelry forms that support and contain the images are contemporary yet suggestive of historical styles of ornament. They are primarily fabricated from metal, but often incorporate more eclectic materials. They are characterized by strong symmetry and bold scale.
Why do you make art?
I can’t help myself! That sounds silly but it’s pretty accurate. Art making is something I have to do. There is an inexplicable drive – one I think most artists have, to conceive ideas then manifest them in objects we make.
Why do you think art is important in today’s culture?
Art does so many things: It keeps us grounded. It celebrates beauty. It reflects our humanity and reminds us of our mortality. It connects us to nature. It represents our individualism. It links us to our past. It innovates for our future. I could go on and on and on…
Are you from here originally? If not, why did you choose Galveston Island?
I was born and raised in Galveston but lived away for many years because of my husband’s work. When we had the opportunity to move back to the states after residencies in Brazil, Alaska and England, we chose to make the island our home once again. I have always been very proud of Galveston for its diversity, history, natural beauty and its arts community – and the water – we love being near the water, weather hazards and all!
What are the special opportunities and/or challenges of making art in Galveston Island?
I don’t see any challenges really, at least not in a negative sense. The island is perfect for a non-stressful, artistic lifestyle and there are endless sources of inspiration for all types of artists. Furthermore, there’s strong community support for the arts, plenty of galleries, a year-round tourist and second-home retail client base. The Galveston Arts Center keeps us all connected locally, and the proximity to Houston makes it easy to connect to other artists and to get any art materials one could possibly need.
This feature was created to bring our readers’ attention to the professional artists who live and work on or around Galveston Island. Recorded by Elisabeth Lanier, these interviews hope to demystify some of the misconceptions and myths surrounding art and artists. Lanier is an interior designer and space planner who, with her husband, Steve, is co-owner of DesignWorks gallery and interior design studio, at 2119A Postoffice Street in historic downtown Galveston. She can be reached at 409-766-7599.

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Just in time for the holidays, Buchanan Gallery presents their annual Holiday Group Show & Jewelry Extravaganza, featuring paintings, sculpture and jewelry by a diverse group of their most popular gallery artists.
This exhibition is highly anticipated by collectors and is their largest show of the year. It remains open through Jan. 2011.

Of particular interest this time of year, Buchanan Gallery offers new pieces of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, created by local and national artists including Laurence Dusaulx, Mary Jarvis, Armande Potel Martin, Lisa McConnell, Margarita Mileva, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, Lisa M. Wilson and Dottie Wood.
Jewelry is located in their gallery, where you can also discover more artworks perfect for gift giving.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment. For more information please call 409-763-8683 or visit us online at www.buchanangallery.com.

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Visit the interior of the Urban Lofts to see Homer Allen’s large scale ‘Outside Art,’ perfect for fences, in gardens, pool patios or decks. Using cut out vinyl from used billboard ads, he stretches the smaller pieces and recycles them as canvas. With billboard enamels, on water-resistant surfaces, the paintings can be displayed indoors or out.

The series currently on exhibition at PeckArts, Homer Allen refers to as Flower ‘line art.’ Swaying toward Pop Art, big, bright and bold hibiscus repeat in the foreground in contrast with delicate and symbolic backdrop of roses and lilies. Allen uses flowers because they are “pop”ular and even when abstracted or simplified are highly recognizable images, offering variety in shapes and configurations. Throughout the collection viewers will experience the layers and image relationships created by his handmade stencils as well as his flat, bold shapes right up on the picture plane. They are truly a ‘must see’ for any modern art collector.
Chris Silkwood continues her exhibit Modern Mosaics in the gallery through December. Local painters Jennifer Peck, Russell Mai and photographer Irene Quiroga also show new giclees and originals. Sculptor Nathan Mack shows his robot angles and John Olvery returns with painted and sculpted surfboards. Fish artist J. Vincent Scapace exhibits along with Linda Hardy’s newest collaged bird pieces.
PeckArts Galleries are located at 2208 Postoffice and in the Urban Lofts Building. Open from Wednesday to Saturday from 11a.m. to 6 p.m. and any time by appointment. For more information please call 409-621-1500 or visit the gallery online at www.PeckArts.com.

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The Galveston Art League will hold its annual Holiday Art Market through December 31. It will feature affordable original artwork including acrylics, oils, watercolors, photographs, ceramics, drawings and mixed media pieces. Jewelry, cigar box purses, giclee prints and glass will also be on sale, as well as handmade holiday ornaments, all created by GAL members. Call the league at 409-621-1008 for more information.

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Through December the René Wiley Studio and Gallery will be showing views of Galveston’s alleyways and streets as seen by local oil painter René Wiley during both “Night and Day,” as her most recent show is titled. The artist and owner has beautifully reconstructed downtown Galveston’s architecture into simplified abstractions of the originals. Wiley is inspired by the geometric patterns of form, light and shadow that are found in the east end neighborhoods and her signature use of bold color and thick oil paint to build these uniquely Galveston structures will impress you. Original paintings from previous shows, which include dramatic compositions of Galveston’s native Texas birds, some of which were done in collaboration with local wildlife photographer Irene Amiet Quiroga, as well as serene marsh landscapes and downtown Galveston’s historic churches, are all available in the gallery. Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.

Popular wood sculptor James D. Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has new reclaimed wood sculptures on display in the gallery, depicting local marine life such as pelicans, cranes, redfish, and rays. Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, textile mosaic paintings of Galveston’s downtown architecture available in the gallery. Beautiful laminated wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks are turned from the ‘Iked’ Broadway Oak trees and other reclaimed wood. Glass artist Bill Meek’s gorgeous hammered glass bowls and sculptures are on display, as well as jewelry artist Becky Wolfe’s hand woven crosses of turquoise and amethyst stones.
Other paintings in the gallery include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, published in “Texas Traditions: Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State,” by Michael Duty. Newest to the gallery is painter Rachel Wiley’s collection of urban and rural landscapes, executed in both water soluble oils and acrylic mediums.
The René Wiley Studio and Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewiley.com.

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Wagner Sousa presents “Plate Reverb,” an exhibition of metal wall reliefs and paintings by Devon Moore. The artist extrudes ethereal compositions from industrial material using rhythms of multiple lines through surface treatments to the raw steel as well as paint application and removal. The serene power of his work steadily draws the viewer in, coating the eye with visible space and light.

Look for Houston artist Donna E Perkins with her first show on January 28.
Wagner Sousa Modern Art is located at 404 25th Street (corner of 25th and Market streets). Hours of operation are Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and any day by appointment. For more information please call 409-392-3331 or visit online at www.wagnersousa.com.

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“Celebrate Studio Jewelry,” an exhibition of nationally known, regional and local studio jewelers, which opened Thanksgiving weekend in conjunction with the Galveston ArtWalk®, continues until January 15th at DesignWorks Gallery in historic downtown Galveston.

This survey exhibition is truly a celebration of the breadth and diversity of contemporary studio jewelry, (individually hand-crafted) currently being produced. And, while the Gallery represents these artists on a continuing basis, this exhibition allows them greater presence to show some of their more intricate work.
Participating studio jewelers are: Brooke Barer, Diane Falkenhagen, Karen Gilbert, Anne Elizabeth Jones, Karla Mock, Armande Potel-Martin, Matthew Smith, James Thurman and Sandra Zilker.
Karen Gilbert is a studio jeweler who enjoys a national reputation for her idiosyncratic jewelry. Seduced as she is by the organic forms found in nature – leaves, sea urchins, branches, berries, caterpillars – she combines oxidized sterling silver with unusual, decorative elements, including glass for which she studied at the famed Pilchuck Glass School in Seattle, Wash. The resultant work is eye-catching and easy to wear.
Anne Elizabeth Jones hand-crochets fine silver to create her distinctive, one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry. Her necklaces, which she entitles “floats,” – appropriately so, as they float on one’s collarbones – are gossamer light, but with surprising tensile strength. Her pendants – “little seeds” – contain a pearl hidden within. Jones takes her skill to new levels in creating these wonderfully wearable sculptural pieces.
Armande Potel-Martin comes to us from Saintes, an ancient town in western France not far from the Atlantic Ocean. Potel-Martin brings her exceptional talent, her eye for jewels and her exceptional workmanship to DesignWorks. Well-versed in many jewelry-making techniques, Potel-Martin’s work can be traditional or as contemporary as today. When she employs granulation, which is an ancient technique of fusing tiny metal spheres in a decorative pattern to a surface of the same metal, the result is beautiful and delicate.
DesignWorks is located at 2119A Postoffice Street. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, closed or by appointment, 409-766-7599.

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During the month of December, work will be going on at The Water’s Edge Studio and Gallery, as painter Gayle Reynolds continues to paint palm trees.

Plans are being laid in the boatroom by Rex Reynolds who is boning up on building dories. He will be building a dory again soon, and it has been a long time since his last boat. He plans to spend time at Rosenberg Library reading his book on dories.
Pat Moberley Moore continues to display her marvelous bronze sculptures, whimsical or romantic or mystical, in The Water’s Edge. David Michael Brady has handmade stoneware bowls which are wonderful for use in the kitchen. Raku pottery is by Madeleine Baker, and other pottery is by John Whitman.Charles Caillouet has a fine collection of carved and painted wooden shorebirds mounted on driftwood, as well as the pottery he makes which everyone admires. Blown glass is by Patricia Gruy.
The Water’s Edge is open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, and is located at 1302 21st Street at Avenue M. The building is an 1891 corner store that lost its awning in the great storm.

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By Elisabeth Lanier

Did you go to school for that?
Absolutely! I have my BFA from Sam Houston University, but I don’t think they taught me art. Actually, my studio experience there was in ceramics – all phases – glazes, firings, etc. I loved ceramics! I couldn’t have been more shocked that painting came to me later in life.
After college, I married and we had kids – three beautiful daughters – and that kept me stepping for about a decade. But, then, my mom and I attended a workshop in Austin taught by Ray Vinella, a well-known Taos landscape painter. That was a special week – hard and frustrating, but he taught me that painting was simple, really. Now, I paint nearly every single day.
But, if I weren’t painting, I’d be doing something – when the kids were little, for example, I sewed all my own clothes. No two ways about it, somehow, I’m going to create.

Where do you get your ideas?

I get up in the morning, go out to walk to dog and look up at the sky. I get excited about what I see – the morning light, peoples’ faces – I get so many ideas that there aren’t enough hours in the day to paint them all! But you have to show up – in the studio – and you have to start. You have to show up and you have to get involved with your work. And the idea for one piece leads to the next idea for the next piece. Also, I let myself make a lot of starts. I’m not so worried about the finishes, as long as I’m making a lot of starts.

How long does that take?

Well, since we opened the studio/gallery, I’ve found that the 6-week sections of time (between ArtWalks) have been very helpful to me by creating a deadline. In a way, it’s refreshing to get to/ have to start all over every 6 weeks with a clean slate. I get in there and straighten out the studio, file pictures, put my books away. Then I might work on older, unresolved work; I can rethink things and work on those pieces – or create wholly new work.
Of course, it also takes a lifetime, too.

Define “artist.”

Oh, wow. This may seem strange, but, to me, an “artist” is just being human like everybody else. I think we all have that part of our brain that is artistic; for some, that part remains unused, but for others, those of us who do use that part of the brain, well, then that part becomes larger and demands more energy. It’s too bad that some let that part of their brain atrophy – it needs exercise.
Being an artist is a lifestyle – it but it’s also a God-given part of who you are.
In my opinion, “talent” is tricky – because I think it’s more about having a passion and being willing to work hard to accomplish the things I see in my head.
Throughout history, artists are people who have ideas; they’re always thinking, and cooking up new ways to seeing things.

How would you describe your own work?

Welcoming, friendly, a feeling of coming home. My family and I have a passion for this island, and I want to show Galveston through the eyes of one who loves it. When a client tells me that I paint as they see it – I love that. My work has always been about hospitality. I want it to be inviting. I think feeling estranged – in any way – is the worst feeling.

Why do you make art?

I have no choice. If I couldn’t make art, I’d make my own clothes again, or upholster everything in the house. I have to make. I’m always the student, wanting to get better and better.

Why is art important in today’s culture?

I don’t think there’s been a time in history that is wasn’t important. As I said before, I think it’s fixed in our brain, and after tending to life’s basics, after we’ve fed and clothed and housed ourselves, we want art. Perhaps, today more so than ever because we have more leisure time to think about other things. I think that learning and creating are essential to the human condition.

Are your from here originally? If not, why did you choose Galveston Island?

No, I was raised in Houston and Huntsville and Conroe. My extended family has a house on Sea Isle that we treasure. Leaving the beach – those Sunday evenings were the worst. So, when my husband had an opportunity here, we moved the family. And, we love it! The old Victorian houses especially, with their intricate and beautiful craftsmanship. In our house, I feel as if the ghosts of those artisans surround me – it’s a constant inspiration to me.

What are the special opportunities and/or challenges of making art in Galveston Island?

The opportunities are that I feel very welcomed here. So many artists are located here and their support as a group has meant so much. And, of course, the easy-going atmosphere is comfortable. Also, so many people come here from elsewhere and, with the studio/gallery, my work is seen by many of them. When they drive over that causeway, they’re looking for something new, something different. As to challenges, well, there are storms. And, it’s expensive to live here and not a safe as I would like. I want my surroundings to be calm so that I can create mayhem in my studio. But, then, these challenges give us the opportunity to re-set, don’t they?

This feature of The Islander is a way to bring to our readers’ attention to the professional artists who live and work on or around Galveston Island. Recorded by Elisabeth Lanier, these interviews hope to demystify some of the misconceptions and myths surrounding art and artists. Lanier is an interior designer and space planner who, with her husband, Steve, is co-owner of DesignWorks gallery and interior design studio, at 2119A Postoffice Street in historic downtown Galveston. She can be reached at 409-766-7599.

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“Through November the René Wiley Gallery will be showing views of Galveston’s alleyways and streets by local oil painter René Wiley. The artist and owner has beautifully reconstructed downtown Galveston’s architecture into simplified abstractions of the originals.
Wiley is inspired by the geometric patterns of form, light and shadow that are found in the East End neighborhoods and her signature use of bold color and thick oil paint to build these uniquely Galveston structures will impress you. For the next Artwalk Opening Reception, Saturday, November 26 from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m.

René Wiley will exhibit new architectural paintings of the island by the light of both “Night and Day.” Original paintings from previous shows, which include dramatic compositions of Galveston’s native Texas bids, marsh landscapes, and historic churches, are also available in the gallery.
Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of René Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.
Popular wood sculptor James D. Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has polished reclaimed wood sculptures in the gallery. Many beautiful pieces of marine life include Pelicans, Sea Turtles and Redfish sculptures.
Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, textile mosaic paintings of Galveston’s downtownarchitecture.
Wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks, turned from the Iked Broadway Oak Trees and other reclaimed wood and glass artist Bill Meek’s gorgeous hammered glass bowls and sculptures are on display.
Other paintings in the gallery include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, published in Texas Traditions:
Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State, by Michael Duty and, newest to the gallery, painter Rachel Wiley’s collection of urban and rural landscapes, executed in both acrylic mediums and water soluble oils.
The René Wiley Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewiley.com.

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Galveston Arts Center is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by Galveston-based artist Kamila Szczesna titled fleeting. The exhibition will open during the November 26th ArtWalk and remain on view through January 15, 2012. Curator Clint Willour will lead a gallery talk with the artist beginning at 6:30 p.m. during ArtWalk. The event is free and open to the public.
Ideas of life, science, and time are recurring themes in Szczesna’s two-dimensional and three-dimensional works. Her abstract ink wash drawings on paper are large-scale, organic forms and anatomically-suggestive, life-sized gestures that could also be interpreted as something one might only see through the lens of a microscope. Similar shapes are echoed in the drawings layered within custom light boxes. Specimen-laden Petri dishes, amoeba-like forms and DNA code become scientific portraits of anonymous individuals. The artist is interested in portraying the “essence of life”—the biological basis for existence, which exists in a constant state of motion and flux. Her images reference the fluidity from which all life eventually becomes formed.

Amorphous, bulbous three-dimensional shapes are encased under glass cloches kept beneath black velvet drapes, simultaneously conveying mystery, preciousness, and perhaps an element of danger. Szczesna coated each blobby mass in agar, the gelatinous medium used to grow bacterial cultures, and then licked them, allowing a biological “portrait” of herself to grow within the controlled environment. “Everything is matter built with tirelessly moving particles,” notes the artist. “Nothing is stagnant, everything is moving, and time, as related to the essence of life, is fleeting.”
A native of Wroclaw, Poland, Szczesna moved to Galveston in 2002 when her husband was hired as a molecular scientist at the University of Texas Medical Branch. She received a master’s degree from the Academy of Fine Arts, Wroclaw, in 1999. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including shows at Lawndale Art Center, Houston; Keramikmuseum Westerwald, Germany; Glass and Ceramics Gallery, Wroclaw; and the Museum of International Ceramic Art, Denmark. She has recently had a solo exhibition at Wagner Sousa Modern Art, Galveston
Galveston Arts Center is located on the corner of Market and 25th Streets. It’s open Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 pm. Admission is free at all times.

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Chris Silkwood exhibits her extraordinary mosaic glass pieces at PeckArts in November. Intensely passionate about this fine art, Chris attended the famed Mosaic Art School in Ravenna, Italy as well as studying with the renowned “Artbusters” in Brisbane, Australia. Chris has blended her training and creative instincts to develop a method in her panels and sculpture, that is uniquely her own. Her style remains individual, as it honors this ancient technique but reflects modern design in her remarkable suns, birds, dogs and flowers. Chris’s work has recently gone “Hollywood” and can be seen in the new film “Puncture” starring Chris Evans, and was also featured in the ABC Family show, the “Lying Game”. On a more serious note, she is particularly proud to have exhibited recently at the Nave Museum in Victoria, Texas.

Another new must see are Nathan Mack’s ‘Robot Angels”. Made from vintage parts and antique tools these quirky angelic sculptures are a perfect gift for art-lovers. Hunting from estate sales to junk shops and antique stores, Nathan transforms formerly useful, funky looking parts, into his whimsical Robot Angels.
Delicate gemstones and precious metals are seen in a new light as Houston artist, Lauren Collignon, exhibits her beautifully handcrafted jewelry at PeckArts. Lauren’s appreciation for beauty, diversity and strength are evident in her pieces designed for those with the most distinctive tastes. Also exhibiting are gallery artists, Russell Mai, Irene Quiroga, Mars Woodhill, J. Vincent Scarpace and Jennifer Peck.
PeckArts Galleries are located at 2208 Postoffice and in the Urban Lofts Building. Open from Wednesday to Saturday from 11 to 6 and anytime by appointment. For more information please call 409-621-1500 or visit the gallery online at www.PeckArts.com.

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Isabelle Chapman’s second show at Wagner Sousa is composed of two groups of paintings with day and night as the binding theme.

The work further explores the mystery, energy and the wonder of living. Diane Jones’ new ceramic pieces attempt to capture the feeling and the weight of the waters in the mysterious surroundings of the bayous and swamps of east Texas and Louisiana. Houston artist Devon Moore will be opening his first Galveston show on November 26 displaying work of folded and sanded steel.
Wagner Sousa Modern Art is located at 404 25th Street (corner of 25th
and Market Streets). Hours of operation are Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and any day by appointment. For more information please call 409-392-3331 or visit online at www.wagnersousa.com.

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Large Oil Paintings of Palm Trees and Watercolors of Galveston Houses at ArtWalk

ArtWalk at The Water’s Edge Studio and Gallery on Saturday, November 26, will feature large oil paintings of palm trees, and small watercolors of Galveston houses. These paintings will be made by Gayle Reynolds.

Adirondack tallboys will be on display by Rex Reynolds. Other exhibiting artists are Charles Caillouet, pottery and wooden shorebirds; Madeleine Baker, pottery; John Whitman, pottery; David Michael Brady, stoneware bowls; Patricia Gruy, blown glass; and Pat Moberley Moore, bronze sculptures.
The Water’s Edge is located at 1302 21st Street and Avenue M, and ArtWalk will be held from 4 until 8 p.m. For more information call 409-762-1925 or visit www.GalvestonWatersEdge.com.

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“Galveston: Other Views,” an exhibition of watercolors on paper and sculptural constructions by Gene Aubry, continues at the gallery at DesignWorks in historic downtown Galveston.
In this exhibition, Aubry shows his skill with the well-known form favored by architects, that of a traditional rendering. Clearly, his mastery of this form is evident in these rich and evocative watercolors of beloved and familiar Galveston architecture.

What are more surprising are his “exploded” versions of the same structure – paintings that take architectural elements at once recognizable as being elements of these Galveston buildings, but mixing them up and emphasizing them in wholly new rendition. The end results are lively studies, at once familiar, but now appealingly altered.
The biggest surprise of all is Aubry’s three-dimensional wall sculptures, in which he makes use of common historical elements – railings, baseboards, crown molding, bull’s-eye corners. He cuts them apart, then puts them back together again as vernacular assemblages.
And, in anticipation of our Celebrate Studio Jewelry, opening on November 26th, DesignWorks introduces the wonderful work of two new jewelers, Anne Jones (Denton, Tex.) and Armande Potel-Martin (Saintes, France).
Jones hand-crochets fine silver to create her distinctive, one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry. Her necklaces, which she entitles “floats,” – appropriately so, as they float on one’s collarbones – are gossamer light, but with surprising tensile strength. Her pendants – “little seeds” – contain a pearl hidden within. Jones takes her skill to new levels in creating these wonderfully wearable sculptural pieces.
Potel-Martin brings her exceptional talent, her eye for the jewel and her stunning work to DesignWorks from her native France. Whether it is a ring, a pair of earrings, a necklace, a bracelet, Potel-Martin treats each as the masterpiece, in her hands, in becomes.
Both jewelers join Brooke Barer (Venice, Cal.), (Diane Falkenhagen (Galveston Island, Tex.), Karla Mock (Galveston Island, Tex.), Karen Gilbert (Healdsburg, Cal.), Matthew Smith (Asheville, N.C.), James Thurman (Denton, Tex.), and Sandra Zilker (Houston, Tex.).
The gallery at DesignWorks is located at 2119A Postoffice Street. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, closed or by appointment, 409-766-7599.

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Buchanan Gallery presents ‘Wax, Oil & Wood’ by Gwendolyn Plunkett, Julia Koivumaa, Charyl Weissbach and Seth Hudson
We are pleased to welcome Gwendolyn Plunkett back to Buchanan Gallery with her recent series of richly hued abstract oil paintings. We are also introducing three new artists to the gallery – Julia Koivumaa and Charyl Weissbach, both inspired encaustic and mixed media painters, and soaring overhead, exquisite wood and metal mobile creations by Seth Hudson. This exhibition continues through November 19.

Buchanan Gallery also offers a wealth of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, created by artists from Galveston, Houston, and beyond, including Laurence Dusaulx, Mary Jarvis, Lisa McConnell, Margarita Mileva, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, Lisa M. Wilson, and Dottie Wood. These collections may be found in the Gift Gallery area at the rear of the gallery which also features two and three-dimensional works in a variety of mediums.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic Streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment. For more information please call 409-763-8683 or visit us online at buchanangallery.com.

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The J. Bangle Silk Stocking Gallery is proudly featuring works by Geary Sprague throughout the month. Sprague studied art at the Liliedahl School of Fine Art under the late Johnnie Liliedahl. Enjoy this biography of Sprague and then stop in J. Bangles located at 1124 25th St. to get the full experience.
Growing up Spague developed a deep appreciation of the natural beauty of mother nature. Living in the Houston-Galveston area, he was blessed to be able to see the wonderful harmony of light where the land meets the sea. Sunrises and sunsets provided an endless supply of beautiful scenes where natures reveals her most treasured moments, the transition from day to night, and dark to light. These daily transitions are the ‘golden’ moments we are given every day. We just have to look for them.

“Pulling back the layers of my beliefs and values, I know that this love and appreciation of nature, is the driving force behind the reason that I became a painter,” said Sprague. “In painting I quickly learned that there are no short cuts, you must put in the brush time. I have spent thousands of hours at the easel, and furthering in my art education.”
The luminous style of many of the second generation of the Hudson River painters have greatly influenced the direction and style of his work. He has studied the beautiful works of some of the great masters of landscape painting artist such as Martin J. Heade, John Frederick Kensett, Albert Bierstadt, and Sanford Gifford.
Luminism is an American landscape painting style of the 1850s and 1870s, characterized by effects of light in landscapes, through using aerial perspective, and concealing visible brushstrokes. Luminist landscapes emphasize tranquility, and often depict calm, reflective water and a soft, hazy sky. The term luminism was introduced by mid-20th century art historians to describe a 19th century American painting style that developed as an offshoot of the Hudson River school.
His work is based on the luminous style of painting, however many of my paintings tend to use a warmer palette of hues than the traditional luminous philosophy.

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“After A While,” an exhibition of oil paintings on canvas by Hugh Dodd McDonnold, opened on August 27 at the gallery at DesignWorks in historic downtown Galveston. The opening coincided with the Galveston ArtWalk®.
McDonnold grew up criss-crossing the state of Texas with his dad, a member of an oil exploration crew. Throughout his nomadic childhood, McDonnold spent his time observing the wide-open prairies of central and eastern Texas, the isolated fishing camps scattered along the Texas coastline, and the unforgiving light of the Texas sun. His professional career, in advertising, illustration and art instruction, further prepared him to seek the essential qualities of a product so that others might immediately grasp that import. This practice honed his ability to see the essence of a thing.

In this body of work, a series of landscapes often featuring a single lone building or a small grouping of buildings, we see McDonnold, the observer, and we share his sense of separation. And it is this awareness of the artist as observer – of being separate and apart from what he sees – that permeates his work, and lends to it its sense of solitude, which is not about being lonely. One has the sense of time passing, albeit slowly, of an afternoon spent in quiet contemplation, and after a while, moving on to the next matter.
In these paintings, we see McDonnold’s fine hand, summoning the monolithic from the prosaic, the universal from the commonplace; creating something memorable and insightful from these sheds and shacks. His use of surfaces, from his painterly backgrounds and foregrounds, to the geometry of his walls and roofs, further the illusion of strength and solitude. These planar fields of color drench his canvasses and invite us to share McDonnold’s vision.
The gallery at DesignWorks, in Historic Downtown Galveston, is located at 2119A Postoffice Street. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The gallery is closed Monday and Tuesday or open by appointment, 409-766-7599.

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Kamila Szczesna opens a show of new work, “Transitory States” on August 27th, consisting of a collection of sculptures and drawings focused on the confusion and ambiguity caused by endlessly changing points of relevance. The issue of the time necessary to notice change is represented in the choice of materials, suggesting the vulnerable and ephemeral nature of human life..

Kamila is an artist whose efforts change course with passing time, finding new directions within the work and in outside influences…She is very open to orientation adjustments whether inspired by a gleaned word, object, image or adaptive reaction..This keeps her work in flux, exciting and never repetitive..
You can explore her work and meet the artist during gallery hours as she has her studio in a section of the gallery..You should also visit her website: kamilaszczesna.com.
October 8th Wagner Sousa opens a show of new work by painter Isabelle Scurry Chapman and ceramicist Diane Lane.
Wagner Sousa is located at 404 25th Street. Hours are Wednesday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and any day by appointment. 409-392-3331 wagnersousa.com.

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Buchanan Gallery is pleased to continue“Water Works,” A National Juried Exhibition through September. There are 21 artists selected; although their mediums and styles are diverse, all of their work shares the common theme of water as the subject matter. Water is celebrated as an element so vital to life and to our location on historic Galveston Island. the exhibit features works by: Mallory Agerton, Ruth Andre, Marty Lee Bennett, Penny Cerling, Princess Cook, John Cotter, Jenny DeLaughter, Elizabeth DeLyria, Danna Ruth Harvey, Gema Herrero-Barclay, Zoanna Maney, Kate Matthiesen, R. Keith McNay, Emily Middleton, Sharyn Miller, Jim Robertson, Gabriele Sava, Charlie Jean Sartwelle, Rebecca Swann, Silvia Thornton and Sally Worthington. The exhibition premiered on August 27 at Buchanan Gallery and will continue through October 1, 2011. Please make plans to join them as they celebrate how water has inspired artists and collectors alike through the centuries.

Buchanan Gallery also offers a wealth of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, created by 10 jewelers from Galveston, Houston and beyond, including Kim Colombo, Laurence Dusaulx, Mary Jarvis, Lisa McConnell, Margarita Mileva, Freya Adelle Read, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, Lisa M. Wilson,and Dottie Wood. These collections may be found in the Gift Gallery area at the rear of Buchanan Gallery which also features sculpture along with works of art on canvas and paper.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic Streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday-Monday; noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday; closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment. For more information please call 409-763-8683 or visit the online at www.buchanangallery.com.

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J. Bangle Silk Stocking Gallery will feature world landscape oil paintings and classical stoneware pottery of professional artist David Michael Bradley through October 4.
Bradley mixes up the artist techniques and style of Van Gogh and Picasso by using texture as the main attraction, with bright colors and deep contrast and the selection of chosen subject matter in his oil paintings. “By my own unique style, I oil paint using thick, rough texture as close to the background to a 3-D effect showing every brush stroke with extreme detail,” says Bradley, who usually takes two to three months to complete a work. The final result is the eye-popping texture, in which people want to actually touch the painting itself.
His stoneware pottery is classified as a “antique collectable.” Each piece has the U.S. Department logo and a copyrighted registered patent ink stamp with the artist’s signature, and is wheel thrown and hand sanded for wall strength for a better fit for the glaze application.
J. Bangle Silk Stocking Gallery is located at 1124 25th Street. For more information, call 409-763-6161.

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A lifetime of painting culminates in J. Vincent Scarpace’s show opening during Artwalk for September. This will be his largest exhibition of paintings to date and coincides with his 40th birthday. J. Vincent has created work specifically for this show which pays homage to his past as well as gives a glimpse into his future as a painter. Well known for his abstract fish art, the artist takes his love for creatures of the ocean to a new level and introduces the sensual and mysterious compositions of Jelly Fish. Tall canvases up to six feet and other large scale pieces will be featured at PeckArts and in the Urban Lofts.

Today, J. Vincent Scarpace’s original works can be found in both private, public, and corporate collections in over 40 countries and in all 50 U.S. States. PeckArts is pleased to be the only gallery to represent this progressive, vibrant, and prolific artist by proudly exhibiting his paintings, drawings and watercolors. New small and large scale original fish and turtle paintings will also be featured for your experience, critique, and acquisition.
His numerous south Texas fans and collectors are invited enjoy this exhibition thru the end of September. Come meet an artist who truly follows his life’s passion, intensely pursuing his own artistic potential, and wish him Happy Birthday!
PeckArts is located at 2208 Post Office in the Urban Lofts Building featuring local and contemporary artists. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday 11-6, and anytime by appointment. For more information call 409-621-1500 or 512-576-8233. Visit the gallery on Facebook and visit www.PeckArts.com.

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Avis Frank Gallery will be showing the work of Joseph Cohen and John Adelman through the month of September,
When reading about an artist, one often sees words such as “dynamic” and “unique” without much of an explanation as to why these words apply. One word that you will rarely see is “original” because over the span of many years, most visual ideas have been tried in one way or another. Enter Joseph Cohen. He suggests that a ‘painting’ is split into components. One is the paint and the other is the picture plane. This reduction is based on the radical Concrete Painting Movement established in the early 1920s by artist/philosophers Piet Mondrian and Theo Van Doesburg. These founders of the movement suggested that the plane be flat. This is where Cohen parts company with the movement’s leading lights — introducing multi-plane surfaces and even furniture, thus further blurring the line between painting and sculpture.

The resulting works are a confection of color, shape and texture, where each layer reveals itself as both a color and an act of gravity. Often finished in a thick coat of white paint, there is a continuing act of discovery as the viewer moves towards and around each work. Cohen’s materials consist of only ‘oops’ paint and found objects which makes him one of the most environmentally friendly artists around.
John Adelman is one of the most difficult artists to describe in visual terms. The irony is that many of his works are based around words. Adelman, like Cohen, uses a well-defined, rule-base to inform his collections, with subtle modifications for each work. Take “Distinguish 24,855” for example. Starting with John’s favored base color, he writes words in white gel ink pen that start with a dictionary entry, followed by the word’s definition, then the next entry and so on. These words are spaced precisely and depending on the format of the work, may overlap. Then nails are poured onto the canvas and John traces each one, recording their number as each nail is removed.
The result is a mesmerizing, cloud-like exercise in contrast and weight that becomes beautiful almost in spite of its prosaic components.
The Avis Frank Gallery is located at 215 Tremont Street in Galveston. Visit the gallery at www.avisfrank.com or call 409-763-555. Cohen’s work appears courtesy of Wade Wilson Art. A closing reception will be held on October 1.

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Stop by to cool off and enjoy the newest collection of paintings at The René Wiley Studio and Gallery this September. Local artist René Wiley has spent the summer observing scenes of wildlife near the refreshing waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The gallery is showing Wiley’s newest collection of colorful oil paintings that focus on native Texas birds near the Galveston’s various waterfronts. Wiley has captured delicate portraits of Piping and Snowy Plovers, Black Skimmers and, American Avocets along the stretch of a glistening East Beach. Giant Sandhill Cranes and swooping Kingfishers hunt among the marsh estuaries and brilliant White Ibis and her favorite Rosette Spoonbills stand in striking contrast against cerulean blue shorelines. Whether you come to Galveston for the birds, the outdoors, or the artwork, this show is a refreshing treat to experience.
Originals paintings from previous shows are still available in the gallery, such as dramatic compositions of Galveston’s marsh landscapes, harbor views, and downtown street scenes. Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of René Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.

Popular wood sculptor James Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has polished reclaimed wood sculptures in the gallery. Many beautiful pieces of marine life include nautilus, octopus, and tarpon sculptures. Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, mosaic works of Galveston’s architectural landmarks. Wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks, turned from the Iked Broadway Oak Trees and other reclaimed wood, will be on display this spring as well. Newest to the gallery is glass artist Bill Meek’s gorgeous hammered glass bowls and sculptures. Other paintings include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, recently published in Texas Traditions: Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State, by Michael Duty.
The René Wiley Studio and Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewileyart.com.

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Story & Photos By Leslie Thompson

The charming yellow house at the corner of 21st Street and Avenue M has always sparked my interest. Given its elevated location on our island and knowing of great storms and fires the structure has persevered through, I had a feeling a wonderful story would lie in its walls. The Water’s Edge Studio & Gallery holds many great pieces of art completed by the minds of several talented local Texans and Islanders. Owners and artists, Gayle and Rex Reynolds, perfectly occupy this 1891 corner store as if they were meant to from the very beginning.

“I am interested in painting what I see in Galveston,” said Gayle. “I appreciate the architecture, varieties of palm, and the island birds.” Gayle was born in the great state of Texas and raised in a traditional manner that allowed for the development of her natural artistic talents. Many years after graduating from Sam Houston State Teachers College with a bachelor in English and a minor in Art, Gayle inadvertently began her quest to the water’s edge. It started with a few art workshop invitations from friends…and then she began classes at Glassel School of Art and joined the Houston Art League. After showing her work at the Archway Gallery in Houston during the early 90s, Gayle decided to rent a studio space of her very own near their home in Bellaire. Excelling with watercolors and drawings and battling with oil paintings at the time, she has since come to believe that the oils have helped the watercolors, and the watercolors have definitely helped the oils.

One day, Rex decided to start crafting wooden boats. This is the idea which sparked the beginning of their adventure to Galveston Island. Rex graduated from Texas A&M University class of ’61. Rex has built six different varieties of dories thus far and crafts beautiful wooden tallboy-style chairs and tables, perfect for viewing the island life.
Since 1997, The Water’s Edge Studio & Gallery has housed Rex’s studio space, space to build wooden dories, and plenty of gallery space. You can find hand carved and painted wooden birds mounted on driftwood as well as exquisite pottery by Charles Caillouet and fascinating pottery by David Michael Brady that rings to the touch. Beautiful blown-glass by Patricia Gruy is displayed throughout the gallery, and some of my favorites are the oil-based clay sculptures reproduced in bronze by Pat Moberley Moore. Each of Moore’s sculptures are of a woman – a symbol of beauty – and each one personifies a facet of life or natures elements. Other artists such as Madeleine Baker and John Whitman display wonderful masterpieces here as well.
While capturing glimpses of life on the island, The Reynolds enjoy dining at local restaurants and living the good life. Visit The Water’s Edge Studio & Gallery at 1302 21st Street or online at www.galvestonwatersedge.com.
The entire experience will leave you wanting to take a piece of it with you… so make sure you bring your wallet! The Water’s Edge Studio is open Thursday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.. Call 409-762-1925 for more information.

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“Sculptural Clay: Maggie Fuller, Lisa Orr, Stephanie Thomas,” continues through August 21 at DesignWorks Gallery in historic downtown Galveston.
Clay has been around as long as the earth, and people who mess about with clay have been around since cave days. And, this exhibition focuses on the considerable talent of three Texas ceramicists, Maggie Fuller and Stephanie Thomas, both of Galveston Island, and Lisa Orr of Austin. It also exposes the vastly different qualities inherent in clay as expressed by these three talented women.

Intrigued by the properties of porcelain, while simultaneously seduced by the structure of the exoskeletons of microscopic single-celled animals, Fuller gives her facility for carving full-rein in this new body of work. And, because she is also charmed by how light plays on the surfaces on these new pieces, she leaves the porcelain white – which makes the shadows mysteriously dark.
Orr’s sculptural pieces that also function – or are they functional pieces that are also sculpture? – add color, spontaneity and mirth to this exhibition. Orr is admittedly besotted with strong colors in arresting combinations. Combine that with her keen understanding of the chemistry of glazes and the fanciful forms and shapes with which she embellishes her work and you have something at once familiar – but not.
Simple rotund forms characterize Thomas’ work. But don’t confuse simplicity of line with simplicity of content. Thomas informs her work with the quirky humor of humanity, and with her powerful capacity for observation of the simple things in life and makes of them something larger, something universal.
New to the Gallery are the witty, memory-infused mixed media works on panel of Jenny Leigh Jones (Denton, Tex.). These paintings are engaging because of their complete lack of pretense and because of the purity and simplicity of the artist’s vision.
Also, new to the Gallery is the lyrical and intricate work of Annabelle Jones (Denton, Tex.). Jones hand-crochets fine silver to create her distinct, one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry. The resulting rings, necklaces and earrings are gossamer light, but with surprising tensile strength.
Do stop by the Gallery and see all the wonderful things on hand at DesignWorks.
The gallery at DesignWorks is located at 2119A Postoffice Street in historic downtown Galveston. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, closed or by appointment. Call 409-766-7599.

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Thirty miniature party clothes, in 1840 style, are on exhibit at J. Bangle’s Silk Stocking Gallery, 1124 25th Street in Galveston through August 27. These represent costumes for the opening party scene in the perennial favorite ballet, The Nutcracker, as designed by Pepper Hume.

Instead of the usual painted renderings of the designs, Hume, a veteran theatrical designer and art doll maker, elected to make quarter-scale miniatures of the costumes, right down to the vests and ties and a tiny cameo brooch. Why? The artistic director could not ‘read’ renderings. Not only did she understand the miniatures, but the dancers – professionals, children and parents alike – loved being able to picture the ones they wanted to wear. For instance, the choreographer selected the blue dress for a featured little girl to wear. The four girls rotating in the role voted for the peach one with blue ribbons.
Hume cannot remember “not being able to draw.” But costuming requires both imagining and producing in three dimensions, not to mention thinking in different scales. Constructing these miniatures actually made the construction of the full size costumes easier. Two of those full size costumes are displayed in the Silk Stocking Gallery as well.
Call 409-763-6161 for more information.

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During July, artist and owner Jennifer Peck is featuring her own work showcasing a number of new originals for the show “Summer Lovin’.” One of the recent pieces titled “Early Bird” has special meaning because it’s a scene she witnesses often. “I live close to the Galveston State Park and frequently ride my bike through the bay side during the early morning or evening hours. You see all kinds of birds, and the changes in the colors of the sky are incredible. The sun can look gigantic, and the Great Blue Herons are always wandering through the marshes hunting. When I discovered the wild iris on the west end I was stunned. They are about five feet tall and only bloom for about two weeks, so it’s a real treat to spot them. I was happy to create a composition they both fit in!”

Building her collection of giclee prints has been good for business. She has been able to sell her work outside of Galveston online at PeckArts.com, as well as through galleries and stores around the country. Framed prints, under $100, are also new as she likes to offer affordable work to collectors in a tough economy. PeckArts shows work in the Urban Lofts as well as in the gallery and exhibits local artists Bud Clayton and Russell Mai. New large-scale paintings of abstract fish and turtles are also on display spotlighting works by J. Vincent Scarpace.
PeckArts is located at 2208 Postoffice in the Urban Lofts Building. Hours of operation are Wednesday-Saturday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and anytime by appointment. For more information call 409-621-1500 or 512-576-8233. Follow them on Facebook, and visit the gallery online at: www.PeckArts.com.

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Kamila Szczesna opens a show of new work, “Transitory States” on August 27, consisting of a collection of sculptures and drawings focused on confusion and ambiguity caused by endlessly changing points of relevance. The issue of the time necessary to notice change is represented in the choice of materials, suggesting a vulnerable and ephemeral nature of human life.

The summer group show will be on view until August 19 with new work by Dan Gosch, Patrick Cronin and other gallery artists.
Wagner Sousa is located at 404 25th Street (corner of 15th and Market Streets) Hours are Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and any day by appointment, 409-392-3331. Check them out online: wagnersousa.com.

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Buchanan Gallery is pleased to announce “Water Works,” a national juried competition. The artists and styles presented will be diverse with the common theme of water as their subject matter, an element so vital to life and also to our location on historic Galveston Island.
The exhibition will premier on August 27 at Buchanan Gallery with an ArtWalk opening reception and continue through October 1. Make plans to join them as they celebrate how water has inspired artists and collectors through the centuries.

Buchanan Gallery also offers a wealth of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, created by 10 local jewelers from Galveston, Houston and beyond, including Kim Colombo, Laurence Dusaulx, Mary Jarvis, Lisa McConnell, Margarita Mileva, Freya Adelle Read, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, Lisa M. Wilson and Dottie Wood.
These collections may be found in the Gift Gallery area at the rear of Buchanan Gallery which also features sculpture and works of art on canvas and paper.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic Streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment. For more information call 409-763-8683 or visit them online at www.buchanangallery.com.

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Local artist René Wiley’s has looked to the island’s beautiful architectural gems for inspiration for new colorful paintings. Her chosen subjects are bathed in light amid their own reflections and shadows. She has focused on both the lost and the lingering landmarks of Galveston against vivid skies, including seawall views with the late Flagship Hotel before its demolition, the historical Balinese Room’s long, winding pier over the ocean, and St. Mary’s Cathedral that, although still under interior renovations, remains as an excellent focus for a downtown portrait, just as the Sacred Heart Catholic Church beams majestically white under Galveston’s bright summer sun and cerulean blue sky.

Opening August 27 for Galveston Arts Center’s ArtWalk, Wiley will be showing her newest collection of paintings that focus primarily on Texas native birds; including petite native song birds atop tree branches, grand Rosette Spoonbills, and brilliant white Egrets, all against colorful, abstracted backgrounds. Some originals from previous shows are still available in the gallery, such as dramatic compositions of Galveston’s marsh landscapes and harbor views. Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of René Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.
Popular wood sculptor James Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has polished reclaimed wood sculptures in the gallery.
Many beautiful pieces of marine life include nautilus, octopus, and tarpon sculptures. Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, mosaic works of Galveston’s architectural landmarks. Wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks, turned from the Iked Broadway Oak Trees and other reclaimed wood, will be on display this spring as well.
Newest to the gallery is glass artist Bill Meek’s gorgeous hammered glass bowls and sculptures. Other paintings include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, recently published in Texas Traditions: Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State, by Michael Duty.
The René Wiley Studio and Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewileyart.com.

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“Sculptural Clay: Maggie Fuller, Lisa Orr, Stephanie Thomas,” opens on July 16th at DesignWorks Gallery. The opening coincides with the Galveston ArtWalk.
Clay has been around as long as the earth, and people who mess about with clay have been around since cave days. For those who don’t know, clay bodies come in various forms, earthenware, stoneware and porcelain, and there are differing characteristics within each form, depending on mineral inclusions, etc.

This exhibition focuses on the considerable talent of three Texas ceramicists, Maggie Fuller and Stephanie Thomas, both of Galveston Island and Lisa Orr of Austin. It also exposes the vastly different qualities inherent in clay as expressed by these three talented women.
Recently, during one of Maggie Fuller’s rare fallow periods, she discovered – or rather, re-discovered – working on a potter’s wheel, while simultaneously, she began working with porcelain, fascinated by its properties. Usually, porcelain is glazed (think about those fine Chinese porcelains in the archetypical celadon glaze), but after some experimentation, Fuller opted to leave the porcelain its natural white. At the same time, the forms of microscopic single-celled animals with exoskeletons seduced her. The elegant new forms that have emerged are wholly Fuller’s own. Neither biological reproduction nor pot, these pieces are pure sculpture, intricately carved.
DesignWorks is proud to welcome the work of Lisa Orr to the gallery. Orr, who in addition to making work, teaches, lectures and shows nationally. Her brilliantly colored Majolica stands in stark contract to Fuller’s stark porcelain. Majolica is a soft earthenware ceramic that supports brightly colored metal oxide glazes which, in turn, interact with an underlying glaze and the water content of the clay to produce the dazzling translucent color specific to Majolica.
Rounding out this survey exhibition of what’s good about Texas ceramicists is the work of Stephanie Thomas. Contrasting with the intricacy of Fuller’s forms and the vividness of Orr’s glazes, Thomas’ low-fired clay figures are characterized by a soulful, meditative quality and simple rotund forms. And because Thomas is a sort of stream-of-consciousness artist, her pieces will often be marked with droll comments and wry observations about the time that the particular piece was being glazed and of what was going through her mind – sort of a three-dimensional journal.
The gallery at DesignWorks is located at 2119A Postoffice Street. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, closed or by appointment, 409-766-7599.

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The V. Starke Gallery is, literally and artistically speaking, filled with many unique stories all wrapped into one big inspiring story. Ginny Starke lives her work. She offers an amazing story for just about every painting layering each wall, table, floor space, and spilling from every woven basket case. Starke’s inspiring story blessed our island when her first granddaughter entered this life in the near-by city of Houston, Texas. Galveston Island has embraced her and her paintings ever since. In no time, New Orleans was just a distant memory…
Starke loves Galveston Island for its diversity and its many festivals. She sets her worries aside as she enjoys dawning her gypsy attire throughout historic downtown, and creating stories of a lifetime in the sturdy arms of this extraordinary island. Starke and her friendly docile Pyrenean Shepherd, Lizzy, live the artists dream on that little twenty-third street corner paradise. When you stop by, you can always expect a welcoming smile and a wagging tail from Lizzy.

V. Starke Gallery’s art styles are positioned in the realm of folk and expressionism. Most sales are repeat buyers who crave that next piece of art encompassing one of Starke’s inspiring stories. “As an artist, I feel an obligation to say something with art,” said Starke. “I have just enough talent to be frustrated, and I will never be one of the greats, but I just can’t put down my paint brush.”
You can bet that the V. Starke Gallery is a participant in Galveston’s regular Art Walk events. During each Art Walk, you have the opportunity to stop by the gallery and enjoy a complementary glass of wine with your visit. Many paintings now present in the gallery tell a story about a woman’s power. This series in particular was from one of Starke’s recent displays at Art Walk called the “The Art of Discipline.” Each piece speaks about the empowerment of women, and ranges from Sister Mary Magdalene to the Dominatrix. This series of paintings is intended to send this important message to all the women in Starke’s life.
All art enthusiast who need a little spark to ignite those creative senses, come experience it for yourself. The gallery is open Thursday through Sunday during regular business hours, but Starke and Lizzy welcome visitors almost any time just by calling the number listed right outside their door. The V. Starke Gallery is located at 412 23rd Street. For information call 409-370-7161 or visit www.Artmarketgalveston.com.

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Opening on July 16th and continuing through August 19th, Buchanan Gallery is pleased to present “The Landscape.” Working in a variety of mediums, this group exhibition includes gallery artists and artists new to the gallery. With the landscape as their focus, whether along the Texas gulf coast with Kendall Stallings, out in west Texas with Laurel Daniel, or points beyond, they are all sure to be glorious visions to behold! Please join us for this grand tour.

Buchanan Gallery also offers a wealth of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind jewelry, ranging from funky, artful beading to fine gemstone jewelry, created by ten local jewelers from Galveston, Houston, and beyond, including Jan Forrester, Kim Colombo, Laurence Dusaulx, Mary Jarvis, Freya Adelle Read, Amber Tiemann, Carolyn Vieau, and Dottie Wood. New to the gallery is New York City architect and jeweler, Margarita Mileva, with her delightfully created rubber band jewelry! These collections are in the Gift Gallery area at the rear of Buchanan Gallery which also features small, framed, affordable works of art on canvas and paper.
Buchanan Gallery is located at the corner of 25th and Mechanic Streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday or by appointment.
For more information please call 409-763-8683 or visit us online at www.buchanangallery.com

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On July 14, 15 and 16 Bogan Gallery will have a summer sale. Not only will customers save hundreds on works of art, Bogan Gallery is also selling gallery podiums, easels, desks and furniture.
Bogan Gallery will be relocating and is therefore scaling down inventory for the move.

Beginning Thursday, July 14, Bogan Gallery will be open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Don’t wait for the ArtWalk rush, come by Thursday or Friday and get a great bargain!

Bogan Gallery is currently located at 2217 Postoffice in the heart of the downtown arts and entertainment district on Galveston Island. You may contact the gallery at 409-765-1711 or visit the website at www.bogangallery.com.

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This summer Wagner Sousa features new work by represented artists Kamila Szczesna, Patrick Cronin, Loretta Trevino, Dan Gosch, Milton Ausherman, Garance de Selby, Marion Mercer, Meredith Jack, Cliff Kelly, Isabelle Chapman and a few surprises… Modern furniture by Ben Jannsen, Christian Harman and Galveston Woodworks will also be on display.

Kamila Szczesna has some very exciting new work in a different direction for her second solo show with Wagner Sousa Modern Art, beginning August 27.
Wagner Sousa Modern Art is located at 404 25th Street (corner of 25th and Market streets). Hours of operation are Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and any day by appointment. For more information please call 409-392-3331 or visit online at www.wagnersousa.com.

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The René Wiley Studio and Gallery will open with the artist’s newest work on Saturday, July 16 for Galveston Art Center’s ArtWalk evening. Local artist and owner René Wiley always finds unique ways to present our island with brilliant color combinations in thick oil paint strokes atop a variety of canvas sizes. Her chosen subjects are bathed in light amid their own reflections and shadows, and this month Wiley has looked to the island’s beautiful architectural gems for inspiration.

New paintings focus on both the lost and the lingering landmarks of Galveston against vivid skies, including seawall views with the late Flagship Hotel before its demolition, the historical Balinese Room’s long, winding pier over the ocean and St. Mary’s Cathedral that, although still under interior renovations, remains as an excellent focus for a downtown portrait. Sacred Heart Catholic Church beams majestically white under Galveston’s bright summer sun and cerulean blue sky.
Also included in this collection are Wiley’s new pieces of some of her most favorite subjects: petite native song birds atop tree branches and grand Rosette Spoonbills, all against colorful, abstracted backgrounds. Some originals from previous shows are still available in the gallery, such as dramatic compositions of Galveston’s marsh landscapes and harbor views. Limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of René Wiley‘s most popular works can also be purchased and, as all the works in the gallery, can be easily shipped home for traveling convenience.
The René Wiley Studio and Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewileyart.com.

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The Texas Association of Original Doll Artists continues with its themed show titled “Bathing Beauties” at J. Bangles Silk Stocking Gallery located at 1124 25th Street at Avenue L in Galveston.
The Association formed in 1999 and encourages excellence in the creation of their art by arranging exhibit opportunities for their membership. The collection includes dozens of one-of-a-kind cloth and mixed-media art dolls commemorating the historical Bathing Beauty Revue and other beach wonders. The show runs through July 13 featuring original dolls by 12 TAODA artists. TAODA is invited back in November and December 2012 to exhibit original dolls based on a theme of Dickens on the Strand. or more information about TAODA, please visit www.taoda.org.

The “Edge of the Gulf Stream,” by Leslie Sanders will continue through the summer at J. Bangle’s Pirates Beach location. Periodically new works by Sanders will be available through the summer months.
J. Bangle’s Pirates Beach location is at 13708 FM 3005 at 12 Mile Road. Open Tuesdays through Saturday 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sundays from noon until 5 p.m. Closed on Mondays. J. Bangle’s Silk Stocking Gallery is located at 1124 25th Street. Call 409-763-6161 for more information.

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A new group show entitled, “A Summer Selection of Gallery Artists,” opens on June 11 at DesignWorks Gallery in historic downtown Galveston. The opening coincides with this month’s Galveston ArtWalk®.
Featuring the work of Maggi Battalino, Maggie Fuller, Mitchell Gaudet, Larry Spaid and Martha J. Terrill, this show allows DesignWorks’ patrons to see some of the wide variety of styles, mediums and artists represented by the gallery.

Maggi Battalino (Houston, TX) explores circular shapes and edges – each as it relates to our place in the universe. Where do we begin? Where to we end? Where – and what – is the edge? And she explores these concepts with a revived intensity of color. Battalino picks her way among all of these seemingly disparate concepts to arrive at this transcendent body of work, landscapes really, abstract though they are.
Maggie Fuller (Galveston Island, TX), ever beguiled by texture and color, presents us with yet another aspect of her prodigious talent – paintings of her iconic medieval villages, in encaustic medium on panels. This medium which is pigment suspended in melted beeswax, with its capacity to be brushed, sculpted, layered, etched and altered at will – admirably suits Fuller’s artistic tendencies. The resulting paintings are deep, rich pools of color and meaning.
Mitchell Gaudet’s (New Orleans, LA) cast glass pieces, created by pouring molten glass into a mold in sand, set up a running dialogue between passion and reason as he explores the characteristics of each. The found objects from which he creates his molds gain new life as a part of his ongoing body of revealing historical layers of meaning within an entirely contemporary context, and his choice of emblematic words – or lack thereof – further explores the similarities and differences inherent in the objects themselves. It is this disparity that creates an inevitable tension, a cryptic and elusive puzzle for us to ponder.
Larry Spaid’s (Philadelphia, PA) paintings are minimalist works, formally structured and developed around objects of ritual that are heavy with meaning and symbolism. This body of work is a series of reductive and atmospheric paintings on paper. And, in these works, one can see Spaid’s fascination with traditional craft, specifically the richly textured fabrics of Asia. The surface of these luminous paintings is wonderfully worked, and creates a sensuous backdrop against which Spaid’s stark and dynamic symbols dance.
Martha J. Terrill (Galveston Island, TX) is interested in disparate objects, and in these assemblages, she once again explores the relationship between preciousness – that which is held dear – and garbage – that which is cast away. Built on a series of spare and haunting paintings, in stain and watercolor on gessoed boards, against a backdrop of cherished poems, the assembled objects that make reference to the endings of cycles and the new beginnings to be found within.
The gallery at DesignWorks is located at 2119A Postoffice Street in historic downtown Galveston. Hours of operation are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, closed or by appointment, 409-766-7599.

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The gallery will open with René Wiley’s newest show ”In the Shade” on Saturday June 11 for Galveston Art Center’s ArtWalk evening. This artist always pays close attention to how the sunlight falls on an object and in this show Wiley will present bright oil paintings filled with colorful umbrellas, their reflections and their shadows upon Galveston beaches.

This spring Wiley has also been photographing Ibises, Sandpipers and Brown Pelicans near East Beach and its lagoon; recently collaborating with local nature photographer Irene Amiet Quiroga. Dramatic painted compositions from her previous show include stalking Sandhill Cranes, swooping Roseatte Spoonbills and gangs of gulls atop their own reflections in the water. Wiley is well known for her beautiful perspective of Galveston’s unique architecture and alleyways, serene marsh landscapes and striking harbor views.
Originals from previous collections are still available in the gallery, along with limited edition, gallery-wrapped, fine art prints of Wiley‘s most popular works. Popular woodsculptor James Phillips, known for his striking tree carvings found throughout Galveston’s historical neighborhoods, has polished reclaimed wood sculptures in the gallery.
Many beautiful pieces of marine life include nautilus, octopus and tarpon sculptures. Nationally recognized textile artist Brenda Bunten-Schloesser has several new hand-dyed, mosaic works of Galveston’s architectural landmarks. Wood bowls by artist Dale Hooks, turned from the Iked Broadway Oak Trees and other reclaimed wood, will be on display this spring as well. Other paintings include a collection of marsh landscape paintings by Texas oil painter Darlene Wall, recently published in “Texas Traditions: Contemporary Artists of the Lone Star State,” by Michael Duty.
The René WileyStudio and Gallery is located at the corner of 22nd Street and Postoffice Street, next door to Mod Coffeehouse, at 2128 Postoffice Street. Open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information call the gallery at 409-750-9077 or visit www.renewileyart.com.

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John Van Domelen returns to Bogan Gallery with a show inspired by the forms of the sea, “Poseidon’s Garden,” on view June 11 through July 9. Last year’s show, in addition to being a sell out, resulted in a feature of Van Domelen’s “Eye of the Storm,” a piece inspired by Ike, in the American Association of Woodturners magazine, and in the piece being purchased by the Galveston Historical Society for display in their headquarters in the Customs House.

A third generation woodturner, Van Domelen was introduced to the lathe by his grandfather Paul R. Smith. Van Domelen uses the lathe as the primary tool in the creation of his art and craft. Further work is sometimes done off the lathe. For example, he may carve, burn, texture and dye some pieces in order to further bring forth the beauty in the wood. He does use some rare tropical hardwoods, however, when possible, he buys small pieces of wood and cutoffs that otherwise might be discarded. He also uses a substantial amount of what he calls reclaimed lumber. New housing developments and tree trimmers have been great sources for this wood that would otherwise clog our landfills. Van Domelen has a vested interest in forest conservation and works toward a balance in the stewardship of this resource.
This show features pieces that are sculptural and meant to hang on walls, as well as vessels that sit on flat surfaces. Coral is a central theme, both black and white, where diverse shapes are borrowed from the natural form to embellish the shape and texture of vessels. The public is invited to the preview on Friday, June 10, from 6 to 9 p.m., which, unfortunately, Van Domelen will not be able to attend. All are also welcome at the Artist’s Reception on Saturday, June 11, from 6 to 9 p.m. which Van Domelen will attend.
Bogan Gallery is located at 2217 Postoffice on Galveston Island. Hours of operation are Thursday from 1 to 5 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. Call 409-765-1711 or visit the website: www.bogangallery.com.

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The opening of Leslie Sanders lastest exhibition, “Edge of the Gulf Stream,” will be on the June 11 ArtWalk at J. Bangle’s Pirates Beach location. The artist’s reception will be from 2 to 5 p.m.
Leslie Sanders is a self taught painter who was influenced early on growing up and sailing the waters of the Texas Gulf Coast and Galveston Island.
Her grandmother was a well known painter and potter, and her studio was the childhood inspiration for Leslie’s art introduction and later, the training ground for her media choices and technique.
Her education includes studies at Texas A&M, Texas A&M Galveston, and Southwest Texas State University.

Following school, a lark as a SCUBA instructor on a charter live aboard in the Bahamas forged an unexpected career path.
First a mate, then a captain, Leslie’s yachting has encompassed both sail and power ranging between New England, the East coast, Bahamas, Caribbean, the Pacific coast of Central America and Mexico to Alaska. Tortola served as home base for a number of years. Her yachting experience includes major refits on vessels ranging from classic wooden construction to hi-tech composites and a modern sloop build in Maine.
Fishing is an ongoing passion reflected in paintings of Texas game fish, antique lures from a dear friend’s collection from his California grandfather, and a selection of small works from self tied flies.
When not sailing in the Islands or New England, Ms. Sanders divides her time between West Palm Beach and Houston. Her work is shown in galleries in Galveston, West Palm Beach and the British Virgin Islands. Her paintings hang in several important maritime collections.
Primarily working in oil and watercolor, she is a member of the Pottery Guild of the Palm Beaches and the
Watercolor Art Society-Houston. She had the honor of consideration in the 2011 Hunting Art Prize and is currently entered in the 2011 International Marine Art Exhibition, Mystic Maritime Gallery. Leslie won first place in the D’Feet Cancer Art Competition, Galveston 2010.
Also at J. Bangle Gallery Silk Stalking Gallery, The Texas Association of Original Doll Artists returns with another themed show titled “Bathing Beauties.” The Association formed in 1999 and encourages excellence in the creation of their art by arranging exhibit opportunities for their membership. J. Bangle’s Silk Stalking Gallery is featuring the works of TAODA in June. The collection includes dozens of one-of-a-kind cloth and mixed-media art dolls commemorating the historical Bathing Beauty Revue and other beach wonders. The show runs June 8 through July 13. Meet the artists June 11 at 6 p.m.
J. Bangle’s Pirates Beach location is at 13708 FM 3005 at 12 Mile Road. Open Tuesdays through Saturday 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sundays from noon until 5 p.m. Closed on Mondays. J. Bangle’s Silk Stalking Gallery is located at 1124 25th Street. Call 409-763-6161 for more information.

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